The Career Guide Online Interest Inventory

The Career Guide Online Interest Inventory (CGO-II) is a comprehensive self-assessment tool which enables individuals to anchor their career planning on a foundation of reliable self-generated data about a range of personal characteristics and skill sets that should help to influence choices and plans.

The CGO-II enables individuals to determine how these characteristics relate to the known requirements and features of established job and career clusters. With this foundation, students, young adults, and mid- or late-career professional who are contemplating a career path or a career change will have the ability to assess themselves objectively and receive assistance in interpreting the results.

The CGO-II is based on determinants and factors

IAMA – Interests, Aptitudes, Motives and Abilities.

If taken along with a personality inventory, as recommended for some clients, the acronym becomes PIAMA, with the “P” referring to personality. The development of the instrument is based upon a number of common themes that have influenced major career guidance, counseling, and employment theories.

Career Choice factor Interests: Machines, People, Data, Environment, Artistry Aptitudes: Technical, Verbal, Spatial/ manual, Numerical, Conceptual Motives: Service , Entrepreneurial, Leadership , Collaboration , Spiritual Abilities: Technical, Verbal, Spatial, manual, Numerical, Conceptual Personality: (Optional assessment)

Relating Your CareerGuideOnline results to the Holland Career Model & Job Codes

Dr. John Holland is the most famous developer of career inventories. His Holland Job Codes and Career Models have influenced many later inventories.

The information provided will help you to see the relationships between your CareerGuideOnline results and the classifications developed by Dr. Holland.

CareerGuideOnline results refer to people being grouped loosely into four categories according to whether they would enjoy working with People, Data, Ideas or Things (objects especially equipment and machinery).

In addition to these four very broad areas, Dr. John Holland’s work led him to divide careers into six categories based on the types of work they required and the types of people they attracted.

In the 1960s, John Holland made a major contribution to the development of career guidance theory by developing his model of the six dominant types of work and six personality types. He gave these the following labels: Realistic, Investigative, Artistic, Social, Enterprising, and Conventional. In the view of Holland, matching involves two processes: Individuals seek occupations that suit their own tendencies and work environments develop characteristics that attract different personality types.

A brief description of each of the Holland categories will help you to make the connection between each type and the CareerGuideOnline Clusters. Some jobs found in one CareerGuideOnline Cluster may also be spread over different Holland Career Types. In some cases, the sections of a cluster that is more relevant than others to the Holland Type, will be underlined.

Career Guide Clusters

Holland's Six Career Types

Cluster 1 – The Engineering, Construction & Design
Cluster 2 – Transport & Travel
Cluster 3 – Animals, Plants & Agriculture
Cluster 15 – Information, Communication & Computer Services
Cluster 16 –Mining & Manufacturing

Realistic – Persons attracted to these careers tend to:

> Understand and prefer things they can see, touch, and use like plants and animals, tools, equipment, or machines.
> Be skilled in handling tools, equipment, machines, diagrams, numbers etc.
> Prefer working with animals, tools, or machines rather than social activities like teaching, healing, and informing others;
> See themselves as logical, practical, mechanical and realistic rather than imaginative, creative or comfortable being in close contact with others

Cluster 3 - Animals, Plants, & agriculture
Cluster 4 - Science, Technology & the Environment
Cluster 11 - Health & Medicine
Cluster 12 - Legal, National & Security Services
Cluster 15 - Information, Communication & Computer Services

​Investigative - Persons attracted to these careers tend to:

> Understand and prefer logical processes and calculations such as those encountered in math & science problems;
> Be good at applying analytical tools used in investigation and scientific processes
> Prefer working with scientific principles,concepts and chemical / physical substances, rather than leading selling or persuading people
> See themselves as precise, scientific, and logical

Cluster 8 - Media, Journalism & Entertainment
Cluster 13 - Visual & Applied Arts & Crafts
Cluster 1 - Engineering, Construction & Design
Cluster 6 - Business Management Services

Artistic - Persons attracted to these careers tend to:

> Understand and prefer creative activities like art, drama, crafts, dance, music, or creative writing
> Be talented in specific artistic areas such as creative writing, drama, crafts, music, or art;
> Prefer work which involves creative processes using imagination, innovation and design rather than working with tangible, logical processes or with calculations and scientific problems
> See themselves as expressive, original, and independent

Cluster 7 - Social Work & Human Services
Cluster 9 - Education
Cluster 12 - Legal, National & Security Services
Cluster 11 - Health & Medicine
Cluster 5 - Food, Hospitality & Tourism

Social - Persons attracted to these careers tend to:

> Understand people's needs and actions and prefer careers which permit them to use this to help people in various ways
> Be good at dealing with people and responding to their needs
> Prefer work which involves interacting with people and helping them in roles like, teaching, nursing, or giving first aid, providing information, rather than working with machines, tools, or animals
> See themselves as helpful, friendly, and trustworthy.

Cluster 6 - Business Management Services
Cluster 2 - Transportation & Travel
Cluster 12 - Legal, National & Security Services
Cluster 9 - Education

Enterprising - Persons attracted to these careers tend to:

> Understand how to lead and persuade people, selling things and ideas
> Prefer work which involves influencing people rather than carrying out activities that require careful observation and scientific, analytical thinking;
> Be good at leading people and selling things or ideas;
> See themselves in politics, leadership, or business and as energetic, ambitious & sociable

Cluster 1 - Engineering, Construction & Design
Cluster 2 - Transport & Travel
Cluster 4 - Science, Technology & Environment
Cluster 6 - Business Management Services
Cluster 16 -Mining & Manufacturing
Cluster 3 - Animals, Plants & Agriculture

Conventional - Persons attracted to these careers tend to:


> Like working with numbers, records, or machines in a set, orderly way rather than dealing with imaginative or unstructured activities
> Be good at working with written records and numbers in a systematic, orderly way
> See themselves as orderly and good at following a set plan

RELATING YOUR INVENTORY RESULTS TO THE HOLLAND CAREER MODEL & JOB CODES

Dr. John Holland is the most famous developer of career inventories. His Holland Job Codes and Career Models have influenced many later inventories. The following summary information will help you to see the relationships between your Career Guide results and the classifications developed by Dr. Holland.

You will remember that the introduction to your Career Guide Results referred to people being grouped loosely into four categories according to whether they would enjoy working with People, Data, Ideas or Things (objects especially equipment and machinery). In addition to these four very broad areas, Holland's work led him to divide careers into six categories based on the types of work they required and the types of people they attracted. Below we will provide you with a brief description of each of the Holland categories and help you to make the connection between each type and the Career Guide Clusters. You must remember that although there are six types, some persons may be attracted to jobs in more than one category. Also some of the jobs included in a particular Holland group may be found in more than one Career Guide cluster. Some jobs found in one Career Guide Cluster may also be spread over different Holland Career Types. In some cases, the sections of a cluster that are more relevant than others to the Holland Type, will be underlined The Career Guide Online Interest Inventory (CGO-II) is a comprehensive self-assessment tool which enables individuals to anchor their career planning on a foundation of reliable self-generated data about a range of personal characteristics and skill sets that should help to influence choices and plans.

IAB